Meaning Leverage
What does Leverage mean? Here you find 93 meanings of the word Leverage. You can also add a definition of Leverage yourself

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Leverage


‘Leverage’ is a US term that is also known as ‘gearing’. Both express the extent to which any transaction is financed by debt from lenders as opposed to capital provided by the investor.
Source: moneyweek.com

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Leverage


1) n. the use of borrowed money to purchase real estate or busine...
Source: dictionary.law.com

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Leverage


The use of debt financing, or property of rising or falling at a proportionally greater amount than comparable investments. For example, an option is said to have high leverage compared to the underlying stock because a given price change in the stock may result in a greater increase or decrease in the value of the option. Also, commonly known as G [..]
Source: nasdaq.com

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Leverage


Having exposure to the full benefits arising from holding a position in a financial asset, without having to fully fund the position with own funds.
Source: stats.oecd.org

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Leverage


In the context of corporate finance, leverage refers to the use of fixed costs within a company’s cost structure. Fixed costs that are operating costs (such as depreciation or rent) create operating [..]
Source: cfainstitute.org

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Leverage


In the traditional sense, the employment of funds for which a firm pays a fixed cost or return. When revenues associated with the employment of these funds exceed the fixed cost or returns, the firm [..]
Source: irmi.com

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Leverage


1724, "action of a lever," from lever (n.) + -age. Meaning "power or force of a lever" is from 1827; figurative sense "advantage for accomplishing a purpose" is from 1858 [..]
Source: etymonline.com

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Leverage


The degree to which a change in sales volume leads to a subsequent change in operating profits and financial performance of a company.
Source: ama.org

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Leverage


The ability to control a large amount of real estate with a little amount of money.
Source: atlasvanlines.com

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Leverage


Taking something small and exploding it. Leverage can be financial or technological.
Source: inboundlogistics.com

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Leverage


The effect on a company when the company has bonds, preferred stock, or both outstanding. Example: If the earnings of a company with 1,000,000 common shares increases from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000, earnings per share would go up from $1 to $1.50, or an increase of 50%. But if earnings of a company that had to pay $500,000 in bond interest increased [..]
Source: raymondjames.com

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Leverage


A term describing the greater percentage of profit or loss potential when a given amount of money controls a security with a much larger face value. For example, a call option enables the owner to ass [..]
Source: optionseducation.org

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Leverage


to use, especially to use an existing asset.
Source: nationalgeographic.org

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Leverage


See Gearing
Source: glossary.reuters.com

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Leverage


The means for exercising influence for attaining goals or gains. [D03643]
Source: maxwideman.com

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Leverage


In procurement terms leverage means the use of economies of scale to secure improved value.  For example, aggregation of demand may give the buyer more leverage, as will reducing the variety of solut [..]
Source: cips.org

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Leverage


The use of credit or loans to enhance speculation in the financial markets. Suppose, for example, that you take the $1,000 in your bank account to your stock broker and purchase $1,000 worth of stocks [..]
Source: glossary.econguru.com

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Leverage


1) The use of borrowed money to purchase real estate or business assets, usually involving borrowed money that equals a high percentage of the value of the purchased property. The dangers of high leve [..]
Source: nolo.com

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Leverage


supplement with leverage; "leverage the money that is already available" the mechanical advantage gained by being in a position to use a lever strategic advantage; power to a [..]
Source: google-dictionary.so8848.com

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Leverage


    Exertion of a force on one end of an object, which results in the object’s opposite end moving in an opposite direction.
Source: factcheckgolf.org

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Leverage


Using debt in order to control more assets. Also known as financial leverage.
Source: accountingcoach.com

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Leverage


Definitions (2) 1. The degree to which an investor or business is utilizing borrowed money. Companies that are highly leveraged may be at risk of bankruptcy if they are unable to make payments on thei [..]
Source: investorwords.com

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Leverage


an index which indicates the degree of regression in a case with a full set of predictor variables.
Source: psychologydictionary.org

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Leverage


The use of borrowed money in the context of alternative investments which allows for the purchase of more of a given asset than would otherwise be possible. Because of the greater size of holding, the [..]
Source: thepensionsregulator.gov.uk

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Leverage


Borrowed capital is used to enlarge the potential return of an investment. Leverage refers to the amount of debt used to finance the assets of a company. If the company has a considerable amount of mo [..]
Source: financialdictionary.net

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Leverage


the use of credit to enhance one's speculative capacity
Source: dictionary.findlaw.com

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Leverage


The use of credit to finance a portion of the costs of purchasing or developing a real estate investment. Positive leverage occurs when the interest rate is lower than the capitalization rate or projected internal rate of return. Negative leverage occurs when the current return on equity is diminished by the employment of debt.
Source: irei.com

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Leverage


The use of borrowed funds to increase the profit from an investment.
Source: nysscpa.org

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Leverage


Using long-term debt to secure funds for an organization. In the social investment world, often refers to financial participation by other private, public or individual sources.
Source: gdrc.org

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Leverage


The ability to control large dollar amounts of a commodity with a comparatively small amount of capital.
Source: cmegroup.com

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Leverage


The use of borrowed money to increase investing power.
Source: investinginbonds.com

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Leverage


Total assets divided by equity. Higher numbers indicate greater borrowing to finance asset purchases; leverage can tend to make positive performance more positive and negative performance more negativ [..]
Source: wisdomtree.com

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Leverage


  Measures how well the business is capitalized and the relationship of internal vs. external financing that's support the assets of the company. Financial Leverage (assets diveded by [..]
Source: farm-equipment.com

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Leverage


The level of debt expressed as a percentage of equity or as a ratio to equity.  The U.S./Canadian word for gearing.
Source: people.hbs.edu

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Leverage


Leverage is also known as gearing. Where a position can be taken in product with only a fraction of its value.
Source: cityindex.co.uk

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Leverage


Leverage, reflects the amount or proportion of debt used in the financing structure of an organization; the higher the leverage the more debt the company uses.
Source: financial.math.ncsu.edu

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Leverage


The relationship of other people’s money (debt) in relation to your own investment (equity) in your business. This is measured by the debt-to-worth ratio.
Source: famemaine.com

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Leverage


A measure of how much debt is used to purchase assets; for example, a leverage ratio of 5:1 means that $5 of assets were purchased with $4 of debt and $1 of capital.
Source: fcic.law.stanford.edu

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Leverage


A company is leveraged when it has a high ratio of debt to equity. If the company can use the extra debt to expand and generate more than enough additional revenue to cover the higher interest costs, [..]
Source: zacks.com

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Leverage


The use of a large loan and a small amount of cash to make a purchase.
Source: mortgageloan.com

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Leverage


“The term "leverage" includes--
Source: definitions.uslegal.com

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Leverage


A financial mechanism used to increase available funds usually by issuing debt (typically bonds) or by guaranteeing or otherwise assuming liability for others' debt in an amount greater than cash balances.
Source: fhwa.dot.gov

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Leverage


A US term to indicate the degree to which a business is funded by loans rather than by shareholders' equity (i.e. the indebtedness of a firm compared to its equity structure). This is equivalent [..]
Source: legacy.intracen.org

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Leverage


Make use of; translate into additional gains. This is an extremely common Consulting word. For example: “We need to leverage the core competencies we have in the mortgage lending business to our oth [..]
Source: streetofwalls.com

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Leverage


This mechanical advantage obtained by use of a lever or combination of levers.
Source: rsmck.com

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Leverage


A gain in output force over input force by sacrificing the distance moved. Mechanical advantage or force multiplication.
Source: eaton.com

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Leverage


The use of borrowed money to increase investing power.
Source: sifma.org

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Leverage


The use of financial instruments or borrowed capital to increase potential gains or losses. For example, borrowing money to invest in property or other assets, buying a share in a 'geared' m [..]
Source: moneysmart.gov.au

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Leverage


measures the exposure of a company’s surplus to various operating and financial practices. A highly leveraged, or poorly capitalized, company can show a high return on surplus, but may be exposed to [..]
Source: gohallam.com

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Leverage


The use of borrowed money to buy more of an asset than would otherwise be possible in order to increase the potential profit earned on that asset.
Source: fiscalagents.com

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Leverage


The degree to which investors or businesses utilize the money that they have borrowed. Highly leveraged companies may be at risk of bankruptcy if unable to make payments on their debt and of finding lenders from which to borrow money in the future. Companies may reduce the debt they owe by reducing their work forces, selling unprofitable divisions [..]
Source: fundsus.deutscheam.com

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Leverage


Practice of reusing previously translated segments stored in a TM in the execution of new translations. Also, a measure of the extent to which the workload of a new translation can be reduced by using a TM.
Source: capstan.be

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Leverage


  -  The term leverage refers to a closed-end fund borrowing money to buy additional securities in the hope that securities purchased with the borrowed funds will return more profits than they will [..]
Source: quantumonline.com

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Leverage


See gearing
Source: aviva.com

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Leverage


When a fund is said to be leveraged it is deemed to have more than exposure than 100% of its net asset value: the aim is to take on more risk in order to generate higher returns. Liabilities
Source: investecassetmanagement.com

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Leverage


Leverage usually refers to a fund being exposed by more than 100% of its net asset value to assets or markets. The aim may be to take on more risk in order to generate higher returns, or it may actual [..]
Source: schroders.com

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Leverage


see ‘Gearing
Source: theinvestmentassociation.org

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Leverage


Leverage usually refers to a fund being exposed by more than 100% of its net asset value to assets or markets. The aim may be to take on more risk in order to generate higher returns, or it may actually be to reduce risk in the portfolio. It is achieved by combining derivatives with more traditional equity or bond investments. Confusingly, leverage [..]
Source: schroders.co.uk

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Leverage


Measures financial leverage using market leverage, book leverage, debt-to-assets, and senior debt rating.
Source: tcw.com

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Leverage


Using "leverage" is the process of investing using borrowed funds. Leveraging your investments magnifies your returns, both positive and negative.
Source: mohlmanassetmanagement.com

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Leverage


In finance, leverage is a general term for any technique to multiply gains and losses.
Source: gam.gi

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Leverage


Leverage see loan to value (LTV).
Source: britishland.com

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Leverage


 the use of debt in an investment, including the acquisition and capital expenditures. Through leverage, general partners are able to expedite improvements at portfolio companies and amplify returns.
Source: pitchbook.com

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Leverage


This is the ratio between the net asset and net capital, including fiscal year dividends and the allocation of fiscal year profit; so, it indicates the ratio between the total debt of a business and t [..]
Source: ideafimit.it

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Leverage


Using borrowed money to make an investment. Leveraging has a higher return potential as well as a higher loss potential.
Source: wellsfargo.com

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Leverage


Act as mechanically increasing system like lever.(2)This is o ne of the main drivers of the return on equity (ROE). It is defined as total debt divided by equity (called 'gearing' in some countries).
Source: bankingglossary.bankingonly.com

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Leverage


The use of financial instruments to increase the return on an investment, or the amount of debt used to finance a business’ assets.
Source: barnesroffe.com

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Leverage


The use of credit or loans to enhance speculation in the financial markets. Suppose, for example, that you take the $1,000 in your bank account to your stock broker and purchase $1,000 worth of stocks [..]
Source: amosweb.com

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Leverage


Company debt expressed as a percentage of equity capital. High leverage means that debts are high in relation to assets. The equivalent UK term is gearing.
Source: eagletraders.com

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Leverage


the amount of debt used to finance an asset. A firm with significantly more debt than equity is considered to be highly leveraged.
Source: fsi.gov.au

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Leverage


The use of borrowed capital for an investment in order to significantly increase the profits that can be made from it. For example, with a leverage ratio of 1:200, a trader can trade a notional amount [..]
Source: fortrade.com

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Leverage


Additional money or activity that an investment in a programme leads to.
Source: communityplanning.net

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Leverage


A method of grantmaking practiced by some foundations. Leverage occurs when a small amount of money is given with the express purpose of attracting funding from other sources or of providing the organ [..]
Source: cof.org

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Leverage


 The degree to which a firm uses debt to finance its operations.
Source: understand-accounting.net

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Leverage


see Financial Leverage Ratio
Source: winninginvesting.com

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Leverage


 – The use of borrowings to increase the return of an investment.
Source: australianstockreport.com.au

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Leverage


The ratio of debt to equity to finance a company's operations and new projects. A company is highly leveraged if it is using a large proportion of debt (i.e., bonds or loans) versus equity to finance its operations.
Source: ase.com.jo

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Leverage


The ability to control large dollar amounts of a commodity with a comparatively small amount of capital.
Source: tradestation.com

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Leverage


Borrowed capital. It is typically used to increase equity returns on the company’s investments. Companies with a lot of borrowed capital are called highly leveraged. Firms that finance assets with leverage are expected to be more risky over the long term.
Source: truewealthpublishing.asia

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Leverage


A measure of debt. A highly leveraged company has high debt. The leverage ratio is total assets divided by shareholders’ equity. A leverage ratio of 1.0 means that the company has no debt, and the hi [..]
Source: dividenddetective.com

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Leverage


the use of a small amount of money to control a large number of securities
Source: tastytrade.com

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Leverage


  The methods and techniques used to ensure a sponsorship is managed in such a way that it generates the maximum possible value for the sponsor.
Source: booksites.net

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Leverage


The use of debt financing of an investment to maximize the return per dollar of equity invested
Source: pmea.ca

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Leverage


  The use of fixed costs in an attempt to increase (or lever up) profitability. [Chapter 16] Leveraged buyout (LBO)
Source: wps.pearsoned.co.uk

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Leverage


  The use of both fixed operating and financing costs by the firm. [Chapter 16] Trade credit
Source: wps.pearsoned.co.uk

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Leverage


The use of debt financing, or property of rising or falling at a proportionally greater amount than comparable investments. For example, an option is said to have high leverage compared to the underly [..]
Source: people.duke.edu

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Leverage


Historically it is considered the ratio of debt to equity. It is also referred to as gearing. Leverage can be calculated in different ways and therefore direct comparisons are difficult. In banking le [..]
Source: barbicanconsulting.co.uk

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Leverage


In finance, leverage (or gearing in the United Kingdom and Australia) is any technique involving using debt (borrowed funds) rather than fresh equity in the purchase of an asset, with the expectation [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Leverage


Leverage or leveraged may refer to: Leverage (mechanics), mechanical advantage achieved by using a lever Leverage (album), a 2012 album by Lyriel Leverage (dance), a type of dance connection Leverage [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Leverage


In negotiation, leverage is the power that one side of a negotiation has to influence the other side to move closer to their negotiating position. A party's leverage is based on its ability to award b [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Leverage


Leverage is an American action crime drama television series, which aired on TNT from December 7, 2008, to December 25, 2012. The series was produced by Electric Entertainment, a production company of [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Leverage


In statistics and in particular in regression analysis, leverage is a measure of how far away the independent variable values of an observation are from those of the other observations. High-leverage [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Leverage


Leverage is the fourth studio album by the German folk metal band Lyriel.
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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