Meaning hearsay
What does hearsay mean? Here you find 46 meanings of the word hearsay. You can also add a definition of hearsay yourself

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hearsay


n. 1) second-hand evidence in which the witness is not telling wh...
Source: dictionary.law.com

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hearsay


Evidence presented by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. With some exceptions, hearsay generally is not admissible as evidence at trial
Source: uscourts.gov

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hearsay


"information communicated by another, gossip," mid-15c., from phrase to hear say (Middle English heren seien, Old English herdon secgan). The notion is "hear (some people) say;" fr [..]
Source: etymonline.com

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hearsay


a type of testimony given by a witness who relates not what he/she knows personally, but what others have told the witness, or what the witness has heard said by others; may be admissible or inadmissi [..]
Source: nycourts.gov

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hearsay


Testimony given by a witness who is not telling what he or she knows personally, but what others have said.
Source: nolo.com

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hearsay


heard through another rather than directly; "hearsay information" rumor: gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth Hearsay is information [..]
Source: google-dictionary.so8848.com

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hearsay


a statement made out of court and not under oath which is offered as proof that what is stated is true called also hearsay evidence
Source: dictionary.findlaw.com

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hearsay


Hearsay is defined as "a statement, other than one made by the declarant while testifying at the trial or hearing, offered in evidence to prove the truth of the matter asserted." United Stat [..]
Source: definitions.uslegal.com

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hearsay


(n) gossip (usually a mixture of truth and untruth) passed around by word of mouth(adj) heard through another rather than directly
Source: beedictionary.com

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hearsay


Evidence not known to a witness personally, but which was relayed to witness by a third party, i.e., secondhand information. Generally inadmissible in court, although exceptions exist under which it c [..]
Source: pacourts.us

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hearsay


Testimony by a witness concerning events about which the witness has no personal knowledge. Hearsay testimony conveys not what the witness observed personally, but what others told the witness or what [..]
Source: jec.unm.edu

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hearsay


Evidence offered by a witness based on what others have said.
Source: courts.state.md.us

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hearsay


Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court.
Source: americanbar.org

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hearsay


Out of court statements made by third parties. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court, but there are exceptions.
Source: courts.countyofdane.com

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hearsay


Evidence presented by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. With some exceptions, hearsay generally is not admissible as evidence at trial.
Source: oregonlaws.org

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hearsay


Second-hand evidence, generally consisting of a witness's testimony that he/she heard someone else say something.
Source: utcourts.gov

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hearsay


Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but learned about it through secondhand information such as another’s statement, a newspaper, or a document. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court, but there are many exceptions to that rule.
Source: justice.gov

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hearsay


the principle that hearsay (secondhand reporting of events as opposed to what one has personally witnessed) was not admissable in court was beginning to emerge during the early modern period, although [..]
Source: earlymodernweb.org.uk

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hearsay


Evidence based upon the reports of others, rather than on the first-hand experience of a witness.
Source: manhattanda.org

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hearsay


A witness generally may not testify about an incident  he has only heard about from someone else. This is called hearsay evidence.
Source: breakdown.myajc.com

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hearsay


Testimony of a witness that is not from his or her personal knowledge, but from what the witness has heard another person say.
Source: victimlaw.org

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hearsay


This is testimony which is based upon out of court statements offered for the truth of the matter asserted. In plain terms, this is when testimony is presented based upon the reports of others and not [..]
Source: mazzeipolk.com

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hearsay


Evidence that is not within the personal knowledge of the witness but was relayed to the witness by a third party.
Source: 1888drugcrimes.com

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hearsay


Hearsay is information about an event or situation, provided by an individual who had no direct experience of it. Second- or third-hand reports, rumour and gossip all constitute hearsay. In most cases [..]
Source: lawgovpol.com

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hearsay


Evidence offered by a witness based on what others have said.
Source: mdcourts.gov

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hearsay


Evidence that has not come to the court first hand, or by the person who directly experienced it. Not admissible in the adversary system of trial.
Source: letasa.asn.au

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hearsay


Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court. impeachment:
Source: 4uth.gov.ua

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hearsay


n. 1) second-hand evidence in which the witness is not telling what he/she knows personally, but what others have said to him/her. 2) a common objection made by the opposing lawyer to testimony when i [..]
Source: advocatekhoj.com

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hearsay


Evidence not proceeding from the personal knowledge of the witness; heard through another rather than directly.
Source: iiss.biz

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hearsay


Hearsay in criminal proceedings is a statement not made in oral evidence in the proceedings that is evidence of any matter stated. For example Steven tells the police when providing a witness statemen [..]
Source: 1itl.com

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hearsay


Evidence based upon the reports of others, rather than on the first-hand experience of a witness.
Source: nycdefense.com

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hearsay


Hearsay is a statement made by an out of court declarant that is introduced in the court for the truth of the statement. However, hearsay is viewed to be unreliable and the confrontation clause of the constitution guarantees a defendant the right to confront any witnesses against him or her. Therefore, in criminal trials, hearsay cannot be introduc [..]
Source: criminallawyerwashingtondc.com

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hearsay


Statements by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court.
Source: manateeclerk.com

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hearsay


An out-of-court statement, offered in court to prove the truth of the matter stated, through a witness other than the person who originally made the statement.
Source: sao9.net

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hearsay


Evidence presented by a witness who did not see or hear the incident in question but heard about it from someone else. With some exceptions, hearsay generally is not admissible as evidence at trial.  [..]
Source: docmckee.com

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hearsay


Evidence where the information adduced is not direct evidence from …
Source: ipglossary.com

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hearsay


n. 1) second-hand evidence in which the witness is not telling what he/she knows personally, but what others have said to him/her. 2) a common objection made by the opposing lawyer to testimony when i [..]
Source: glennarmentor.com

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hearsay


Information that was heard by one person about another. (law) Evidence based on the reports of others rather than on personal knowledge, which is normally inadmissible because it was not made unde [..]
Source: en.wiktionary.org

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hearsay


Hearsay evidence, in a legal forum, is testimony from an under-oath witness who is reciting an out-of-court statement, the content of which is being offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted. [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


Hearsay evidence, in a legal forum, is testimony from an under-oath witness who is reciting an out-of-court statement, the content of which is being offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted. [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


Hearsay is the second solo studio album by American recording artist Alexander O'Neal. It was originally released in July 1987, on the labels Tabu and Epic as the follow-up to O'Neal's critically and [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


"Hearsay" is a song written by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis and recorded by American recording artist Alexander O'Neal. It is the fourth track from the singer's second solo album, Hearsay (1987). The ori [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


Hearsay evidence, in a legal forum, is testimony from an under-oath witness who is reciting an out-of-court statement, the content of which is being offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted. [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


Hearsay, in law, refers to a testimony based on what a witness heard rather than what they witnessed personally. Hearsay or Hear Say may also refer to:
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


Hearsay is the second solo studio album by American recording artist Alexander O'Neal. It was originally released in July 1987, on the labels Tabu and Epic as the follow-up to O'Neal's critically and [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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hearsay


rumor, report
Source: eenglish.in

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