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Definitions (1836)

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a posteriori


In rhetoric, logic, and philosophy, a belief or proposition is said to be a posteriori if it can only be determined through observation (Palmer 381). In general, these are inductive arguments in which [..]
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a priori


In rhetoric, logic, and philosophy, an argument is said to be a priori if its truth can be known or inferred independently of any direct perception. Logic, geometry, and mathematics are usually held a [..]
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abbey theatre


The center of the Irish Dramatic movment founded in 1899 by W. B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, built with the express purpose of presenting Irish plays performed by Irish actors. It opened in 1904 and bega [..]
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ab ovo (latin


This phrase refers to a narrative that starts at the beginning of the plot, and then moves chronologically through a sequence of events to the tale's conclusion. This pattern is the opposite of a [..]
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abecedarian


See discussion under acrostic, below.
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abecedarius


See discussion under acrostic, below.
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ablative case


Click here for expanded discussion.
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ablaut


Jacob Grimm's term for the way in which Old English strong verbs formed their preterites by a vowel change. This is also called gradation. An example would be the principal parts of Old English s [..]
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abolitionist literature


Literature, poetry, pamphlets, or propaganda written in the nineteenth century for the express purpose of condemning slaveholders, encouraging the release and emancipation of slaves, or abolishing sla [..]
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above


Also called "the aloft" and sometimes used interchangeably with "the Heavens," this term refers to the gallery on the upper level of the frons scenae. In Shakespear [..]
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