Meaning paradigm

What does paradigm mean? Here you find 43 meanings of the word paradigm. You can also add a definition of paradigm yourself

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paradigm


1(formal or technology) a typical example or pattern of something a paradigm for students to copy The war was a paradigm of the destructive side of human nature.2(grammar) a set of all the different f [..]
Source: oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com

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paradigm


late 15c., from Late Latin paradigma "pattern, example," especially in grammar, from Greek paradeigma "pattern, model; precedent, example," from paradeiknynai "exhibit, repres [..]
Source: etymonline.com

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paradigm


systematic arrangement of all the inflected forms of a word prototype: a standard or typical example; "he is the prototype of good breeding"; "he provided Americ [..]
Source: google-dictionary.so8848.com

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PARADIGM


noun. I. a model, trend, or representative example, as of the operations and interrelationships of a procedure, an action being analyzed, or the like. 2. an experimental construct or format of the man [..]
Source: psychologydictionary.org

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paradigm


A model, pattern, or example, especially one that revolutionizes the standard approach to a subject or conventional modes of thinking in a profession or field of study. In library and information scie [..]
Source: abc-clio.com

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paradigm


A paradigm is a pattern or an example of something. The word also connotes the ideas of a mental picture and pattern of thought. The entire concept of computers is a paradigm in that computers always [..]
Source: csgnetwork.com

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Paradigm


The most commonly accepted definition of paradigm is that of Thomas Kuhn who describes a paradigm as the set of common beliefs and agreements shared between scientists about how problems should be und [..]
Source: oandp.org

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Paradigm


A clear framework for assigning data and observation to existing theories; a way of thinking about things. In business, rigid adherence to a paradigm can blind executives to threats or opportunities. [..]
Source: erpfocus.com

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paradigm


(Gk: para=beside/ past/ beyond ; deiknumi=show) an example or pattern (set) of thinking. By looking at a problem from a distance, often new insight can be gained.
Source: seafriends.org.nz

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paradigm


is employed, there are fundamental and overriding infrastructural issues which must be addressed at the outset, the most urgent of which are the development of enabling technologies and the creation o [..]
Source: genomicglossaries.com

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Paradigm


The term paradigm simply means exemplar: it has been used in the philosophy of science to refer to a particular thesis about the nature and development of scientific knowledge and in linguistics to re [..]
Source: qualityresearchinternational.com

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Paradigm


In the sociology of science, a coherent tradition of scientific law, theory, and assumptions that forms a distinct approach to problems.
Source: asanet.org

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Paradigm


Kuhn (1962) in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions addressed the problem of how scientists went about their daily work as scientists: what frames their investigations, what rules guide their pract [..]
Source: theoryculturesociety.org

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paradigm


(n) the generally accepted perspective of a particular discipline at a given time(n) systematic arrangement of all the inflected forms of a word(n) a standard or typical example(n) the class of al [..]
Source: beedictionary.com

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paradigm


(n) a way of viewing the world about us. Occasionally new discoveries are made which require a paradigm shift
Source: naturalhealthschool.com

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Paradigm


A body of theory, concepts, assumptions, and empirical evidence that constitute a formal framework for analyzing some phenomena of interest.
Source: its.uci.edu

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paradigm


a typical example or model of something; a conceptual framework underlying the theories and practice of a scientific subject or area of inquiry.
Source: dictionaryofeducation.co.uk

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Paradigm


A set of values, ideas, beliefs and assumptions providing a model or framework within which scientists operate, and providing guidelines for the conduct of research. These are rarely called into quest [..]
Source: polity.co.uk

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PARADIGM


A world view, a model or pattern, a mental framework for thinking, for organizing information, and for understanding and explaining reality.
Source: crossroad.to

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Paradigm


is the set of fundamental assumptions that influence how people think and how they perceive the world.
Source: dot-connect.com

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Paradigm


The automatic Nature of accessing word meaning.
Source: online-medical-dictionary.org

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paradigm


The highest, most general level in a hierarchy of scientific intellectual structures. A paradigm is a generally accepted view of the nature of a scientific discipline.
Source: www2.hawaii.edu

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PARADIGM


A symbolic representation of relations. For example, a three-term contingency in which a response (R) produces a reinforcer (Rf) in the presence of a discriminative stimulus (SD) might be written as. [..]
Source: scienceofbehavior.com

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paradigm


The set of forms belonging to a particular word-class or member of a word-class. A paradigm can be thought of as a vertical list of forms which can occupy a slot in a syntagm. Pronounced [ˡpærədaim [..]
Source: uni-due.de

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Paradigm


An example, model or pattern.
Source: aboutbioscience.org

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paradigm


The idea of a paradigm, in the sense of a dominating principle governing a whole area of scientific research, was invented by Thomas Kuhn (1962), a ...
Source: dictionaryofeconomics.com

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paradigm


a cluster of conceptual and methodological presuppositions embodied in an exemplary body of scientific work. A paradigm implicitly defines for a given scientific community the kinds of questions that [..]
Source: muskingum.edu

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paradigm


pretentious and overused term for a way of thinking. Often used with the erroneous assumption that "paradigms" are mutually exclusive, and often assuming that one paradigm is inherently s [..]
Source: stroustrup.com

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Paradigm


A general conception, model, or "worldview"; that may be influential in shaping the development of a discipline or subdiscipline (for example, "the classical, positivist social science [..]
Source: nsc.edu

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Paradigm


A coherent and mutually supporting pattern of concepts, values, methods and action, amenable or claiming to be amenable, to wide application.
Source: communityplanning.net

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paradigm


According to Thomas Kuhn, an intellectual framework for “normal” science, which is superseded by another paradigm in a scientific “revolution.”
Source: utpteachingculture.com

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paradigm


A point of view in which some principles, approaches, concepts, and even theories, have been stated uniformly. A set of assumptions about reality that, when applied to a particular situation, can be u [..]
Source: informatique.umons.ac.be

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paradigm


A system of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality. An example serving as a model or pattern; a template. * '''2000''', "": *: According to the Fo [..]
Source: en.wiktionary.org

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Paradigm


A distinctive set of thought patterns or ways of doing things.
Source: rgs.org

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paradigm


Refers to a pattern or model; a collection of assumptions, concepts, practices, and values that constitutes a way of viewing reality, especially for an intellectual community that shares them.
Source: celp.ca

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Paradigm


In science and philosophy, a paradigm is a distinct set of concepts or thought patterns, including theories, research methods, postulates, and standards for what constitutes legitimate contributions [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


A paradigm, in science and epistemology, is a distinct concept or thought pattern Paradigm may also refer to:
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


In the behavioural sciences (e.g. psychology, biology, neurosciences), an experimental paradigm, is an experimental setup that is defined by certain fine-tuned standards, and often has a theoretical b [..]
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


Paradigm is a comic book series by Matthew Cashel and Jeremy Haun.
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


Paradigm (パラダイム, Paradaimu) is a Japanese publishing company headquartered in Suginami, Tokyo Prefecture, Japan. The company mainly publishes novels based on adult visual novel video games.
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


Paradigm is a comic book series by Matthew Cashel and Jeremy Haun.
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


Paradigm is a comic book series by Matthew Cashel and Jeremy Haun.
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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Paradigm


Paradigm is a point-and-click adventure video game developed by Jacob Janerka for Microsoft Windows.
Source: en.wikipedia.org

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