Meaning mood
What does mood mean? Here you find 34 meanings of the word mood. You can also add a definition of mood yourself

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mood


"grammatical form indicating the function of a verb," 1560s, an alteration of mode (n.1), but the grammatical and musical (1590s) usages of it influenced the meaning of mood (n.1) in phrases [..]
Source: etymonline.com

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mood


"emotional condition, frame of mind," Old English mod "heart, frame of mind, spirit; courage, arrogance, pride; power, violence," from Proto-Germanic *motha- (source also of Old Sa [..]
Source: etymonline.com

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mood


An emotional state at a particular time. A mood felt by an individual at one point in time may be unrelated to emotions felt an another point in time.
Source: ama.org

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mood


A state of mind or emotion, a pervading impression. Related: The Sublime and the Spiritual Landscapes: Real and Imagined The Materials of Minimalism Surrealist Landscapes Modern Landscapes Walker Evan [..]
Source: moma.org

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mood


Stereotypically: romance, comedy, mystery, fantasy, or horror. Mood is one of the prime considerations in determining the lighting-look; another is . . .
Source: lowel.tiffen.com

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mood


temper: a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a [..]
Source: google-dictionary.so8848.com

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mood


Mood shows the attitude of the speaker or the writer to the action or state described by the verb. 1) The Indicative is the verb used in ordinary statements and questions: She went home.Has she called [..]
Source: usingenglish.com

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mood


The general feeling or emotion of the text. The mood created by the language assists the composer to convey his/her attitudes about the subject on an emotional level.
Source: schoolatoz.nsw.edu.au

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mood


how you feel in your mind. You can be in a good mood when you are happy or in a bad mood when something has made you cross or unhappy
Source: eenglish.in

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mood


In literature, the emotive attitude or feeling carried by a particular text, for example happiness, excitement, doom. It has much in common with tone (see tone). Grammatically, a verb form conveying t [..]
Source: syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au

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mood


 –  the feeling that is created in the reader as a result of the tone or atmosphere in a work such as anger.  Tone is created by how the author describes the characters, setting, and events such [..]
Source: phccwritingcenter.org

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mood


the atmosphere created by a piece of writing
Source: essentiallyeducation.co.uk

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mood


 anger.
Source: shakespeare-online.com

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mood


shtimung
Source: yiddishdictionaryonline.com

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mood


How do you know what a mood disorder is without really knowing what "mood" is? In a nutshell, "mood" is an overall feeling or mental state such as happiness, anger, tension, or anx [..]
Source: alleydog.com

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mood


The mood of a verb is the manner in which the action or condition is conceived or intended. In English there are three verb moods. 1. Indicative, a verb stating an apparent fact or asking a question. [..]
Source: englishplus.com

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mood


the emotional dimension or feeling of a play scene or moment in the action.
Source: artsonline2.tki.org.nz

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mood


(n) a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling(n) the prevailing psychological state(n) verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
Source: beedictionary.com

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mood


(modus): a category of the verb phrase. See imperative, indicative, subjunctive.
Source: folk.uio.no

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mood


A background feeling that extends over a length of time and which appears to have no specific cause or origin. (Contrast emotion and temperament.) Examples of moods include feeling tired, feeling grumpy, feeling agitated, feeling contented, or feeling energized. Moods are accessible to introspection so we can describe how we feel. While many cultur [..]
Source: music-cog.ohio-state.edu

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mood


Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered Anger, annoyance, or impatience.
Source: online-medical-dictionary.org

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mood


the quality of a verb that expresses the speaker’s attitude toward the likelihood, existence, or desirability of the verb’s action. In English, the three moods are indicative, imperative, and subj [..]
Source: grammarist.com

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mood


A division in the verbal area which refers to whether the action of the verb represents a fact, a wish, a possibility, necessity or a command.
Source: uni-due.de

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mood


  A persistent and overriding emotion that is present. (e.g., depressed, euphoric, anxious)
Source: nchpeg.org

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mood


a conscious state of mind or predominant emotion.
Source: scribendi.com

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mood


verb form that depicts the attitude of the writer or speaker e.g. subjunctive, indicative, imperative, conditional
Source: tefl.net

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mood


  A reference to the moods or modes expressed through verbs by the writer. The verbs reflect the writer's mood about what he writes. Verbs have three possible moods. The indicative mood describe [..]
Source: writingenglish.com

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mood


The feeling created in a work or art.
Source: cfisd.net

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mood


The feeling either intended by the originating artist or perceived by person viewing the work of art.
Source: xamou-art.com

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mood


Atmosphere, feeling, spirit, aura, tenor, flavor or tone evoked by a work of art.
Source: cheapjoes.com

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mood

Source: createfixate.com

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mood


A mental or emotional state, composure. ''I've been in a bad mood since I dumped my boyfriend.'' A sullen mental state; a bad mood. ''He's in a mood with me today.'' A disposition to do some [..]
Source: en.wiktionary.org

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mood


You know how you set the mood for a party by turning down the lights and cranking up the Vengaboys? Writers do the same thing in literature. Mood refers to the emotional atmosphere that a writer const [..]
Source: shmoop.com

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mood


Coming to prevalence in 2016, "mood" is a slang term roughly synonymous with "sentiment", specifically a sentiment that is familiar to the speaker and that he/she recognises as being well expressed. Can be used by calling something "a mood" or simply saying "mood" when one feels empathy with a scenario or depiction of a scenario.

Ex.
Person 1: Look at this picture of a cat looking depressed that I found on the internet lol
Person 2: Mood
Pauly - 8 April 2019


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