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Definitions (97)

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monogastric


Animals having a single compartment or simple stomach system (e.g., swine, horse). Contrast with rumen and ruminants.
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silage


Silage refers to the feed preserved by an anaerobic fermentation process (e.g., corn silage, haylage, high moisture corn) in which lactic acid and volatile fatty acids (produced by fermentation) lower the pH of the silage. The low pH preserves the silage. See Ensiled.
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Acid Detergent Fiber


The fibrous component represents the least digestible fiber portion of forage or other roughage. This highly indigestible part of forage includes lignin, cellulose, silica and insoluble forms of nitrogen but not hemicellulose. Forages with higher ADF are lower in digestible energy than forages with lower ADF, which means that as the ADF level incre [..]
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acid detergent fiber


The fibrous component represents the least digestible fiber portion of forage or other roughage. This highly indigestible part of forage includes lignin, cellulose, silica and insoluble forms of nitrogen but not hemicellulose. Forages with higher ADF are lower in digestible energy than forages with lower ADF, which means that as the ADF level incre [..]
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Acid Detergent Insoluble Crude Protein or Acid Detergent Fiber-Crude Protein


ADICP (or ADFCP) is the insoluble protein fraction remaining in the acid detergent fiber residue of a feed sample. ADICP escapes ruminal breakdown and represents the portion of the protein that is not degradable and is therefore unavailable to the animal. It also contains any heat-damaged protein that may result from heating during storage or proce [..]
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acid detergent insoluble crude protein or acid detergent fiber-crude protein


ADICP (or ADFCP) is the insoluble protein fraction remaining in the acid detergent fiber residue of a feed sample. ADICP escapes ruminal breakdown and represents the portion of the protein that is not degradable and is therefore unavailable to the animal. It also contains any heat-damaged protein that may result from heating during storage or proce [..]
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Aflatoxins


Fungal or mold growth in or on foods and feed can result in the production of many different types of toxic biochemicals. As a group, these toxic substances are commonly called mycotoxins. The term aflatoxins refers to a particular group of mycotoxins produced by some species of the genus Aspergillus. There are four major aflatoxins named B1, B2, G [..]
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amino acids


A class of nitrogen-containing molecules containing an amine group, a carboxylic acid group and a side chain that varies between different amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks from which protein is made in the body. There are 20 known standard amino acids forming various proteins. When taken up into the body in the diet, the 20 standard [..]
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Anti-quality Factors


Apart from nutrients, forages may contain various harmful compounds that can adversely affect animal performance and cause sickness or even death. These compounds are called anti-quality factors and include tannins, nitrates, alkaloids, cyanoglycosides, estrogens and mycotoxins. The occurrence and/or severity of these factors depend on the forage a [..]
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anti-quality factors


Apart from nutrients, forages may contain various harmful compounds that can adversely affect animal performance and cause sickness or even death. These compounds are called anti-quality factors and include tannins, nitrates, alkaloids, cyanoglycosides, estrogens and mycotoxins. The occurrence and/or severity of these factors depend on the forage a [..]
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