Meaning absorption
What does absorption mean? Here you find 164 meanings of the word absorption. You can also add a definition of absorption yourself

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absorption


the absorbing of insolation to solids, liquids and gases on the surface and in the atmosphere.
Source: itseducation.asia

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absorption


the application to the states of rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution [while Powell [v. Alabama] was sometimes described as having absorbed the right to counsel, the Court there clearly ...
Source: dictionary.findlaw.com

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absorption


One carrier assumes the charges of another without any increase in charges to the shipper.
Source: logisuite.com

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absorption


The process of taking nutrients from the digestive system into the blood so they can be used in the body.
Source: cancer.gov

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absorption


(1) Process of taking in and being made part of an existing amount of matter. (2) Interception of electromagnetic radiation or sound.
Source: physicalgeography.net

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absorption


uptake Penetration of a substance into an organism and its cells by various processes, some specialized, some involving expenditure of energy (active transport), some involving a carrier system, and o [..]
Source: sis.nlm.nih.gov

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absorption


Phenomenon in which radiation transfers some or all of its energy to matter which it traverses. [3]
Source: sis.nlm.nih.gov

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absorption


Uptake to the blood and transport via the blood of a substance to an organ or compartment in the body distant from the site of absorption. [2]
Source: sis.nlm.nih.gov

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absorption


The conversion of one form of energy into another as the energy passes through a medium. For example, seismic waves are partially converted to heat as they pass through rock.
Source: glossary.oilfield.slb.com

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absorption


Act of soaking up and retaining a gas in liquid or in a solid; also retention of radiant energy. 
Source: nwcg.gov

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absorption


1. Penetration of molecules into the bulk of a solid or liquid, forming either a solution or compound. Absorption can be a chemical process (a strong solution of NaOH absorbs CO2 from the air) or a ph [..]
Source: antoine.frostburg.edu

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absorption


A virtuous single-pointed mind of the form or formless realm. They are of two types: close preparations, which are uninterrupted paths, and actual absorptions, which are released paths. See Ocean of N [..]
Source: kadampa.org

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absorption


Occurs when light is partially or completely absorbed by a surface, converting its energy to heat. Selective absorption of light is what causes us to see colors.
Source: photographytips.com

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absorption


The process of taking in, as when a sponge takes up water. Chemicals can be absorbed into the bloodstream after breathing or swallowing. Chemicals can also be absorbed through the skin into the bloods [..]
Source: health.ny.gov

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absorption


The taking in of water and dissolved minerals and nutrients across cell membranes. Contrast with ingestion.
Source: ucmp.berkeley.edu

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absorption


the passage of water and nutrients through cell membranes instead of by direct ingestion. Also refers to how objects convert the solar radiation they receive into heat.
Source: terrapsych.com

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absorption


The process wherein nutrients are absorbed by the body from food after digestion.
Source: buzzle.com

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absorption


The assimilation of one material into another; in petroleum refining, the use of an absorptive liquid to selectively remove components from a process stream.
Source: machinerylubrication.com

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absorption


The process by which light transfers its energy to matter. For example, a gas cloud can absorb starlight that passes through it. After the starlight passes through the cloud, dark lines called absorption lines appear in the star’s continuous spectrum at wavelengths corresponding to the light-absorbing elements.
Source: hubblesite.org

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absorption


In the transmission of electrical, electromagnetic, or acoustic signals, the conversion of the transmitted energy into another form, usually thermal. [After 2196] Note 1: Absorption is one cause of si [..]
Source: atis.org

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absorption


(Abs.) A rule of inference of the form: p ⊃ q ______________ p ⊃ ( p • q ) Example: "If Mary comes to the party, then so will George. Therefore, if Mary comes to the party, then both Mar [..]
Source: philosophypages.com

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absorption


regarding hose, the process of taking in fluid. Hose materials are often compared with regard to relative rates and total amounts of absorption as they pertain to specific fluids.
Source: jgbhose.com

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absorption


Decrease in intensity of radiation, when it crosses a material medium, as a consequence of an interaction between the radiation and the material medium.
Source: sci2.esa.int

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absorption


1. The damping of a sound wave when it passes through a medium or hits a surface.
Source: songstuff.com

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absorption


noun. 1. disregard for other beings, things, or concepts due to overwhelming interest in one specific being, thing or concept. 2. the process of drawing liquid and other absorbed matter into a cell vi [..]
Source: psychologydictionary.org

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absorption


The properties within paper that cause it to absorb liquids (inks, water, etc.) which come in contact with it.
Source: neenahpaper.com

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absorption


absorption (pop)
Source: users.ugent.be

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absorption


Process by which nutrients are absorbed through the lining of the intestinal tract into capillaries and into the bloodstream. Nutrients must be absorbed to affect the body.
Source: medindia.net

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absorption


The process of contacting a vapor and gas stream with an absorbing liquid to remove specific materials from the gas stream.
Source: aiche.org

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absorption


The loss or dissipation of energy as it travels through any medium. For example, radio waves lose some of their energy as they travel through the atmosphere.
Source: csgnetwork.com

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absorption


The process by which water is absorbed. The amount of water absorbed under specific conditions, usually expressed as percentage of the dry weight of the material.
Source: deeconcrete.com

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absorption


In general: the process of absorbing; taking up of water and nutrients by assimilation or imbibition. The taking up by capillary, osmotic, chemical or solvent action, such as the taking up of a gas by [..]
Source: fao.org

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absorption


A test method for stone from the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM). Absorption is the percentage of moisture absorption by weight. The process by which a liquid is taken into (soaked up [..]
Source: selectstone.com

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absorption


(n) - the process by which energy is transformed into other kinds
Source: sherwoodrocks.net

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absorption


The property of materials such as clothing, drapes, carpeting on racks, acoustic ceilings, etc., which causes them to soak up or deaden sound.
Source: summit.com

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absorption


When a solid takes up molecules into its structure.
Source: lenntech.com

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absorption


The tendency of sound waves to be soaked up by soft surfaces. Opposite: reflection.
Source: stirlingaudioservices.com

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absorption


The process of absorbing or of being absorbed — to incorporate or take up– to take in.
Source: enviroliteracy.org

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absorption


The transformation of light into heat as it passes through a dense medium.
Source: exfo.com

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absorption


In plasma physics, the loss of (electromagnetic) energy to a medium. For instance, an electromagnetic wave which propagates through a plasma will set the electrons into motion. If the electrons make collisions with other particles, they will absorb net energy from the wave.
Source: utdallas.edu

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absorption


With respect to Radiation Protection , absorption describes a mode by which Radioactive materials may enter the body leading to an Internal Radiation hazard. For example it is well known that H-3 cont [..]
Source: ionactive.co.uk

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absorption


The act or process of absorbing or sucking in anything, or of being absorbed and made to disappear; as, the absorption of bodies in a whirlpool, the absorption of a smaller tribe into a larger. (conte [..]
Source: allwords.com

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absorption


Absorption refers to the act or process of including a thing into something else. Generally, the act of absorption is used in the application of rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution to actions b [..]
Source: definitions.uslegal.com

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absorption


Retention of oil or fat by a food product which has been fried. A certain amount of fat is desirable to provide flavour, eating quality, etc. to the food. However, excessive absorption imparts an unpl [..]
Source: arrowscientific.com.au

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absorption


(n) (chemistry) a process in which one substance permeates another; a fluid permeates or is dissolved by a liquid or solid(n) (physics) the process in which incident radiated energy is retained with [..]
Source: beedictionary.com

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absorption


Uptake of matter or energy by a substance
Source: esdac.jrc.ec.europa.eu

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absorption


  The incorporation or soaking in of substances (solids, liquids, gases, light or heat) by a system
Source: doctor.ndtv.com

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absorption


To take in substances through the skin or mucous membranes.
Source: familydoctor.org

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absorption


"Absorption is investment and consumption purchases by households,businesses, and governments, both domestic and imported. When absorption exceeds production, the excess is the country's cur [..]
Source: tradeport.org

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absorption


In pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, absorption is the process whereby medicines are transported or taken up from the site of administration (by mouth, inhalation, intravenous or intramuscular inject [..]
Source: eupati.eu

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absorption


Integration of particles of a substance in the volume of another substance: An example ist the integration of oxygen in water. Absorption must be differentiated from Adsorption what adresses the adhes [..]
Source: plasma.com

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absorption


One carrier assumes the charges of another without any increasein charges to the shipper.
Source: gaclaser.co.za

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absorption


A process by which electromagnetic radiation imparts energy to matter.
Source: nde-ed.org

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absorption


The process by which some of the atoms, molecules or ions of a gas or liquid mixture are brought into (i.e absorbed by) a different solid or liquid.  Absorption often involves a chemical reaction.
Source: powerengineering.org

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absorption


absorber – a material that attenuates sound by taking in the sound waves with minimal reflection. There are two main classes of absorbers: resonant absorbers and porous absorbers. Sometimes called s [..]
Source: lossenderosstudio.com

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absorption


the process of taking in a sound wave rather than passing it through or reflecting it. Sometimes called acoustic absorption.
Source: lossenderosstudio.com

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absorption


 – Refers to a measure of the amount of light absorbed by an object, instead of being reflected. Dark colored and matte surfaces are the least likely to reflect light. Accent Lighting –
Source: kichler.com

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absorption


When a weight of water is permeated or soaked into a paver unit. Often referred to as a ‘rate of absorption’ or as a percentage.
Source: distinctiveoutdoorconcepts.com

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absorption


The penetration of substances into the bulk of a solid or liquid.
Source: pilotchemical.com

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absorption


A process whereby, when two phases are brought into contact, a given component is transferred from one phase to the other (after IUPAC, 1972). Experimental differentiation of absorption and adsorption [..]
Source: ilo.org

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absorption


A phenomenon in which radiation transfers to matter which it traverses some or all of its energy (ISO, 1972).
Source: ilo.org

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absorption


In chemistry absorption can mean two things: Firstly it can imply that powerful forces exist holding two substances together, and that seperation of the two is not easily accomplished. Secondly it can [..]
Source: ch.ic.ac.uk

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absorption


The ability of substances to neither reflect nor transmit light. Its dimension is the absorption ratio, which is defined as the ratio of absorbed luminous flux to incident luminous flux.
Source: erco.com

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absorption


Process by which a substance or particle is drawn into the structure of another.
Source: newh.org

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absorption


the penetration of atoms, ions, or molecules into the bulk mass of a substance.
Source: environmentallawyers.com

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absorption


The uptake of water , other fluids, or dissolved chemicals by a cell or an organism (as tree roots absorb dissolved nutrients in soil.)
Source: infohouse.p2ric.org

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absorption


The passage of one substance into or through another.
Source: legacy.azdeq.gov

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absorption


A process by which light is taken-up by another material. Examples include soot consisting of tiny black particles, which absorb all visible light; and nitrogen dioxide, a pollutant mostly from diesel [..]
Source: legacy.azdeq.gov

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absorption


The process of taking in, as when a sponge takes up water. Chemicals can be absorbed into the bloodstream after breathing or swallowing. Chemicals can also be absorbed through the skin into the bloods [..]
Source: ehsc.oregonstate.edu

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absorption


The process of taking in. For a person or an animal, absorption is the process of a substance getting into the body through the eyes, skin, stomach, intestines, or lungs.
Source: atsdr.cdc.gov

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absorption


When light falls on an object some of it is absorbed by the object and is usually converted to heat. The remainder either passes through the object or is reflected from it. The overall proportion of t [..]
Source: camerarepairer.co.uk

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absorption


Light energy lost through transformation to another form, such as heat, while passing through a material.
Source: edmundoptics.com

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absorption


the process by which light falling on a surface is partially absorbed by the surface.
Source: profotos.com

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absorption


When light is absorbed by a surface, its energy is converted to heat through the process of absorption.
Source: tinyprints.com

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absorption


is the process by which chemicals in gaseous, liquid or solid phases are incorporated into and included within another gas, liquid, or solid chemical. For example, sponges absorb water.  
Source: water-research.net

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absorption


The physical or Physiological Processes by which substances, Tissue, Cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.
Source: online-medical-dictionary.org

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absorption


Uptake of substances through the lining of the Intestines.
Source: online-medical-dictionary.org

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absorption


Uptake of substances through the Skin.
Source: online-medical-dictionary.org

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absorption


The light energy (wavelengths) not reflected by an object or substance. The color of a substance depends on the wavelength reflected.
Source: rustoleum.com

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absorption


Not to be confused with adsorption, absorption is one substance is taken up into the interior of another - adsorption with a 'd' is entirely a surface effect. Examples are the swelling of a [..]
Source: discovery.kcpc.usyd.edu.au

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absorption


Refers to the taking up of gases or vapours by liquids and/or solids where the gas or vapour fully penetrates the liquid or solid (adsorption is limited to the surface).
Source: fairplay.ihs.com

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absorption


The physical or physiological processes by which substances or energy are absorbed.
Source: medicaldictionaryweb.com

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absorption


The process in which radiant energy is retained by a substance. A further process always results from absorption, that is, the irreversible conversion of the absorbed radiation into some other form of [..]
Source: earthobservatory.nasa.gov

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absorption


Absorption: The incorporation of a liquid into a solid or of a gas into a liquid or solid.
Source: smartkitchen.com

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absorption


The penetration of a liquid or solid into or through another liquid or solid, the particles that are absorbed being molecular or micellar in size. A few solid bodies have the power of taking up or abs [..]
Source: winning-homebrew.com

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absorption


The process of taking nutrients from the digestive system into the blood so they can be used in the body.
Source: dana-farber.org

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absorption


The digestibility of a dietary supplement into the blood stream.
Source: aboutbioscience.org

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absorption


The taking in or soaking up of one substance into the body of another by molecular or chemical action (as tree roots absorb dissolved nutrients in the soil).
Source: owp.csus.edu

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absorption


In acoustics, absorption is what happens when sound waves are absorbed by a surface, as opposed to bouncing off the surface (reflection). Absorptive materials in a control room, for example, tend to [..]
Source: recordingconnection.com

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absorption


The chemical process by which a hygroscopic desiccant, having a high affinity with water, melts and becomes a liquid by absorbing the condensed moisture.
Source: cagi.org

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absorption


when the substance of interest is captured by another substance, reducing the amount available. For examble, solar energy is absorbed by some atmospheric molecules, solar collectors, and the ocean. Ae [..]
Source: rredc.nrel.gov

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absorption


The penetration of airborne chemicals into a collection medium, such as impinger fluid, where the chemicals will dissolve or react chemically.
Source: skcltd.com

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absorption


the process of retaining incoming radiant energy
Source: mesonet.org

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absorption


The process of absorbing, specifically: 1. <physiology> The movement and uptake of substances (liquids and solutes) into cells or across tissues such as skin, intestine and kiidney tubules, by w [..]
Source: mondofacto.com

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absorption


A process in which a desiccant liquefies by drawing in condensed moisture.
Source: compressedairsystems.com

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absorption


The process by which a liquid or gas is drawn into a porous solid material.
Source: bdma.org.uk

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absorption


The intake of water and other materials through root or leaf cells.
Source: growershouse.com

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absorption


the uptake of water, other fluids, or dissolved chemicals by a cell or an organism (as tree roots absorb dissolved nutrients in soil).
Source: edwardsaquifer.net

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absorption


The capturing of atoms, molecules or ions by the total volume of a substance. The captured matter is held onto and distributed throughout the absorbing substance. This differs from adsorption in whic [..]
Source: heatandcool.com

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absorption


The process by which light transfers its energy to matter. For example, a gas cloud can absorb starlight that passes through it. After the starlight passes through the cloud, dark lines called absorpt [..]
Source: amazing-space.stsci.edu

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absorption


  How a chemical enters a person's blood after the chemical has been swallowed, has come into contact with the skin, or has been breathed in.
Source: adph.org

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absorption


The uptake of water, other fluids, or dissolved chemicals by a cell or an organism (as tree roots absorb dissolved nutrients in soil.)
Source: popstoolkit.com

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absorption


Loss or dissipation of energy as it travels through a medium, Example: radio waves lose some of their energy as they travel through the atmosphere.
Source: hobbyprojects.com

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absorption


intake of light by a material: the darker the material, the more light it absorbs
Source: oes-net.de

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absorption


The process of sucking up; taking in and making part of an existing whole. Compare adsorption.
Source: oilgasglossary.com

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absorption


A method of NGL extraction in which a light oil stream is used to absorb NGL molecules from gas passing through it in a tower. The resulting mix of oil and NGL is fractionated to remove the NGL compon [..]
Source: woodmac.com

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absorption


To soak up as a sponge takes water.
Source: lloydminsterheavyoil.com

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absorption


The ability of gas, liquid or solid to attract and retain another substance without chemical combination. A quantity of such a substance that has absorbed as much of another as is physically possible [..]
Source: helpe.gr

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absorption


The process by which one substance draws itself into another substance. An example is a sponge picking up water, or on oil recovering gasoline from wet natural gas
Source: analystsinc.com

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absorption


The disappearance of one substance into another so that the absorbed substance loses its identifying characteristics, while the absorbing substance retains most of its original physical aspects. U [..]
Source: infobiotech.com.my

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absorption


Act or process of absorbing.
Source: fluor.com

112

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absorption


Chemical or physical take-up of molecules, atoms or ions into the bulk of a solid or liquid, forming either a solution or compound
Source: cgseurope.net

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absorption


A characteristic of flour to take up and retain (hold) water or liquids. It is determined by measuring the amount of liquid needed to make dough of the desired consistency. It is expressed in a percen [..]
Source: homebaking.org

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance.
Source: weatherzone.com.au

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absorption


The process whereby a portion of the radiation incident on an object is converted to heat.
Source: wrds.uwyo.edu

116

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absorption


one substance taking in another, either physically or chemically.
Source: liquisearch.com

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absorption


The process by which one substance is taken into the body of another substance.
Source: web.deu.edu.tr

118

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absorption


In the transmission of electrical, electromagnetic, or acoustic signals, the conversion of the transmitted energy into another form, usually thermal. (188) [After 2196] Note 1: Absorption is one cause of signal attenuation. Note 2: The conversion takes place as a result of interaction between the incident energy and the material medium, at the mole [..]
Source: glossary.westnetinc.com

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absorption


 the solution of one component of a gaseous mixture into a liquid, or the penetration of a gas or liquid into a porous solid. acid gas:
Source: npi.gov.au

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absorption


The process of absorbing nourishment in the small intestine.
Source: crohnsandcolitis.com

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absorption


The property that causes paper to take up liquids or vapors that come into contact with it. In optics, absorption is the partial suppression of light through a transparent or translucent material.
Source: brandfuel.com

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance. The absorbed radiation is then transformed into molecular energy.
Source: docuweather.com

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance. Absorbed energy results in surface heating. Objects take heat and reradiate it at different wavelengths.
Source: pepperridgenorthvalley.com

124

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant
Source: image.weather.com

125

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance by conversion to some other form of energy.
Source: weatherdudes.com

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance. The absorbed radiation is then transformed into molecular energy.
Source: 40north70west.com

127

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absorption


Short for the term Acoustical Absorption (quality of a surface or substance to take in, not reflect, a sound wave).
Source: testing1212.co.uk

128

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absorption


The penetration of atoms, ions, or molecules into the bulk mass of a substance.
Source: contaminatedsite.com

129

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absorption


Dissipation of radio or sound waves as they interact with matter. The absorbing of light waves without reflection or refraction.
Source: interfacebus.com

130

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absorption


In Boolean algebra, the law which states that the odd term will be absorbed when a term is combined by logical multiplication with the logical sum of that term and another term, or when a term is comb [..]
Source: interfacebus.com

131

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absorption


A process whereby a material extracts one or more substances present in an atmosphere or mixture of gases or liquids accompanied by the material's physical and/or chemical changes.
Source: massengineers.com

132

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absorption


absorption (act or process of absorbing, either liquid or light)
Source: en.wiktionary.org

133

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absorption


Uptake. For example, intestinal absorption is the uptake of food (or other substances) from the digestive tract.
Source: medicinenet.com

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absorption


Atmospheric absorption is defined as a process in which solar radiation is retained by a substance and converted into heat energy. The creation of heat energy also causes the substance to emit its own [..]
Source: physicalgeography.net

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absorption


1. Total demand for final goods and services by all residents (consumers, producers, and government) of a country (as opposed to total demand for that country's output). The term was introduced a [..]
Source: www-personal.umich.edu

136

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absorption


[L. absorbere, to swallow down] The movement of water and dissolved substances into a cell, tissue, or organism.
Source: phschool.com

137

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance by conversion to some other form of energy.
Source: w1.weather.gov

138

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absorption


In veterinary medicine, the joining of already digested nutrients with the circulatory system. Absorption is how an animal's body makes use of nutrients from food.
Source: petmd.com

139

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absorption


In radiology, the uptake of energy from radiation by the tissue or medium through which it passes.In radiation or medical physics, the number of disintegrations per second of a radionuclide.
Source: radiologyinfo.org

140

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absorption


1590s, from Latin absorptionem (nominative absorptio), noun of action from past participle stem of absorbere "swallow up" (see absorb).
Source: etymonline.com

141

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance. A further process always results from absorption, that is, the irreversible conversion of the absorbed radiation into some othe [..]
Source: glossary.ametsoc.org

142

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absorption


The process by which light transfers its energy to matter. For example, a gas cloud can absorb starlight that passes through it. After the starlight passes through the cloud, dark lines called absorpt [..]
Source: amazingspace.org

143

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absorption


n. The act or process of absorbing.
Source: easypacelearning.com

144

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absorption


The extraction of one or more components from a mixture of gases when gases and liquids are brought into contact. The assimilation or extraction process causes (or is accompanied by) a physical or che [..]
Source: aga.org

145

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absorption


The incorporation of one serial by another. The note Absorbed: followed by the title of the assimilated serial is added to the bibliographic record representing the assimilating publication, and the c [..]
Source: abc-clio.com

146

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absorption


In paper, the property which causes it to take up liquid or vapors in contact with it. In optics, the partial suppression of light through a transparent or translucent material.
Source: bindagraphics.com

147

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absorption


(a) In physiology: a process by which nutrients move from the lower digestive tract (small and large intestine or colon) into the blood stream to be utilized by the body. (b) In spectroscopy: the inte [..]
Source: whatislife.com

148

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absorption


the conversion of acoustic energy to heat energy
Source: dosits.org

149

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absorption


The rate at which land or buildings will be sold or leased in the marketplace during a predetermined period of time, usually a month or a year. Also called “Market Absorption.”
Source: ssrealty.com

150

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absorption


The difference in the amount of water contained within a concrete masonry unit between saturated and oven-dry conditions, expressed as weight of water per cubic foot of concrete.
Source: contractorschoolonline.com

151

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absorption


The uptake of water , other fluids, or dissolved chemicals by a cell or an organism (as tree roots absorb dissolved nutrients in soil.)
Source: ehso.com

152

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absorption


The way alcohol enters the bloodstream. Alcohol is absorbed into the blood through the stomach and small intestine.
Source: aacea.com

153

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absorption


Acceptance by the carrier of a portion of a joint rate or charge which is less than the amount which it would receive for the service in the absence of such joint rate or charge.
Source: iss-shipping.com

154

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absorption


The process in which one substance is taken into the body of another substance, termed the absorbent. An example is the absorption of water into the soil.
Source: itdoesthejob.com

155

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absorption


Intake or retention of electromagnetic waves by converting wave energy to heat energy.
Source: aquanetto.ch

156

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absorption


Absorption is the assimilation of molecules, or other particles, into the physical structure of a liquid or solid, without chemical reaction.
Source: longcliffe.co.uk

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance. The absorbed radiation is then transformed into molecular energy. ADIABATIC PROCESS
Source: thedenverchannel.com

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absorption


The process in which incident radiation is retained by a substance. A further process always results from absorption.
Source: novalynx.com

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absorption


Uptake of nutrients from the soil by plant roots, or directly into the leaves from foliar sprays. Adsorption:
Source: horizenhydroponics.com

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absorption


The intake of water and other materials through root or leaf cells.
Source: atlantishydroponics.com

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absorption


chemistry - the atomic process whereby an atom or molecule absorbs energy at a given wavelength, causing an electron to move to a higher-energy orbital; the opposite of emission; this term should not be confused with adsorption.
Source: usbr.gov

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absorption


The process of absorbing or of being absorbed -- to incorporate or take up -- to take in.
Source: amyhremleyfoundation.org

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absorption


The taking up or assimilation of one substance by another, where the two substances chemically combine.
Source: oswego.edu

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absorption


The process in which incident radiant energy is retained by a substance by conversion to some other form of energy.
Source: forecast.weather.gov

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